1917-1918 Exhibitions of the Japanese Art Association

Located on the East Coast of the United States, New York was a city where many people from Europe immigrated at the end of the 19th century and prospered as a center of economy, industry, and culture. In the early 20th century, a Japanese community was formed in New York City, mainly consisting of govemment officials and business people.

In New York, where various cultures intersected, artists who studied at Japanese art schools temporarily stayed as relay points to Europe. Japanese artists who studied at American art schools after immigrating to the U.S. as dekasegi (migrant workers) came to the city. Around 1915, a group of artists called the New York Nihon Bijutsu Kyokai (New York Japanese Art Association) was organized around these artists. According to a Japanese-language newspaper published in New York, the initiation of the New York Japan Art Association was held at the Nippon Club in November 1915. This meeting of artists was presided over by Ko Ashihara, a painter who had graduated from the Western-style painting department of the Tokyo School of Fine Art and was attended by Consul General Nakamura, Jokichi Takamine (President of the Nippon Club), and Takanosuke Seko (Manager of the New York branch of Mitsui & Co.) The presence of Japanese Association executives and Japanese business executives at the meeting suggests that the New York Japanese Art Association was supported by local Japanese businesses in New York. Dr. Jokichi Takamine made a speech at the meeting in which he hoped to apply Japanese artistic creation to stimulate American interest and develop trade in Japanese ceramics and porcelain. Japanese companies with branches in New York likely sought out Japanese artists to produce East Asian style works of art intended for export to the Western countries.

Fig. 1. Kotato Gado = T.K. Gado), “Fairly Clouds” “Fairly Clouds” was probably exhibited at the New York Japanese Art Association’s 1917 exhibition. The right side of the painting depicts an oni (demon)-like figure, while the left shows a nymph with a frightened expression, as if fleeing from an oni.

In March 1917, there was an exhibition of the New York Japanese Art Association at the Yamanaka Gallery. The exhibition featured 75 oil paintings, watercolors, architectural drawings, and photographs by I. Kagawa, T.K. Gado, T. Wake, S. Shimotori, K. Ashiwara, T. Ono. S. Hamachi, M. Uwagawa, M. Tsuchiya, I. Takanosu, T. Kikuchi.

he venue, Yamanaka Shokai, was founded by Sadajiro Yamanaka in Osaka, Japan, and was a prominent Japanese antique art gallery. Clients include Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, Charles Lang Freer, Isabella Stewart Gardner of Boston, Ernest Fenollosa, H.O. Havemeyer, and other collectors who laid the foundation for Japanese Art collection in the museums in the United States from late 19th to 20th century. Therefore, one can imagine that the 1917 exhibition of the New York Japan Art Association included works devoted to the East Asian art style.

Fig. 1. Kotato Gado = T.K. Gado, “Fairly Clouds” “Fairly Clouds” was probably exhibited at the New York Japanese Art Association’s 1917 exhibition. The right side of the painting depicts an oni (demon)-like figure, while the left shows a nymph with a frightened expression, as if fleeing from an oni.

In March 1917, there was an exhibition of the New York Japanese Art Association at the Yamanaka Gallery. The exhibition featured 75 oil paintings, watercolors, architectural drawings, and photographs by I. Kagawa, T.K. Gado, T. Wake, S. Shimotori, K. Ashiwara, T. Ono. S. Hamachi, M. Uwagawa, M. Tsuchiya, I. Takanosu, T. Kikuchi.

The venue, Yamanaka Shokai, was founded by Sadajiro Yamanaka in Osaka, Japan, and was a prominent Japanese antique art gallery. Clients include Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, Charles Lang Freer, Isabella Stewart Gardner of Boston, Ernest Fenollosa, H.O. Havemeyer, and other collectors who laid the foundation for Japanese Art collection in the museums in the United States from late 19th to 20th century. Therefore, one can imagine that the 1917 exhibition of the New York Japan Art Association included works devoted to the East Asian art style.

Fig. 1. Kotato Gado = T.K. Gado), “Fairly Clouds” “Fairly Clouds” was probably exhibited at the New York Japanese Art Association’s 1917 exhibition. The right side of the painting depicts an oni (demon)-like figure, while the left shows a nymph with a frightened expression, as if fleeing from an oni.

In March 1917, there was an exhibition of the New York Japanese Art Association at the Yamanaka Gallery. The exhibition featured 75 oil paintings, watercolors, architectural drawings, and photographs by I. Kagawa, T.K. Gado, T. Wake, S. Shimotori, K. Ashiwara, T. Ono. S. Hamachi, M. Uwagawa, M. Tsuchiya, I. Takanosu, T. Kikuchi.

he venue, Yamanaka Shokai, was founded by Sadajiro Yamanaka in Osaka, Japan, and was a prominent Japanese antique art gallery. Clients include Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, Charles Lang Freer, Isabella Stewart Gardner of Boston, Ernest Fenollosa, H.O. Havemeyer, and other collectors who laid the foundation for Japanese Art collection in the museums in the United States from late 19th to 20th century. Therefore, one can imagine that the 1917 exhibition of the New York Japan Art Association included works devoted to the East Asian art style.

Fig. 1. Kotato Gado = T.K. Gado), “Fairly Clouds” “Fairly Clouds” was probably exhibited at the New York Japanese Art Association’s 1917 exhibition. The right side of the painting depicts an oni (demon)-like figure, while the left shows a nymph with a frightened expression, as if fleeing from an oni.

In March 1917, there was an exhibition of the New York Japanese Art Association at the Yamanaka Gallery. The exhibition featured 75 oil paintings, watercolors, architectural drawings, and photographs by I. Kagawa, T.K. Gado, T. Wake, S. Shimotori, K. Ashiwara, T. Ono. S. Hamachi, M. Uwagawa, M. Tsuchiya, I. Takanosu, T. Kikuchi.

he venue, Yamanaka Shokai, was founded by Sadajiro Yamanaka in Osaka, Japan, and was a prominent Japanese antique art gallery. Clients include Rockefeller, Vanderbilt, Charles Lang Freer, Isabella Stewart Gardner of Boston, Ernest Fenollosa, H.O. Havemeyer, and other collectors who laid the foundation for Japanese Art collection in the museums in the United States from late 19th to 20th century. Therefore, one can imagine that the 1917 exhibition of the New York Japan Art Association included works devoted to the East Asian art style.