1922
Gacho-kai Exhibition

Fig. 5. The Gacho-Kai group photo at the exhibition site. In the center of the front row is Kotato Gado(T.K. Gado), and Yasuo Kuniyoshi is on the right side of the front row, facing sideways. Eitaro Ishigaki is on the far left in the back row, Kyohei Inukai is second from the left in the second row, and Toshi Shimizu is fourth from the left in the back row.

The art styles of the artists of the New York Japanese Art Association ranged from Western paintings to applied arts. This was probably due to the fact that many Japanese artists at the time were supported by Japanese companies in the area. Later, the New York Japanese Art Association was consolidated into the newly formed Japanese Painting Association which named “Nihonjin Gakai”, which was composed mainly of painters and sculptors. 
In 1921, the Nihon-jin Gakai was renamed the “Gacho-kai”.

The patrons of the Gacho-kai included JInushi Ennosuke (manager of Morimura Brothers), Shirae Shinzo (deputy manager of Yamanaka Shokai New York Branch), Kodama Kashiro (manager of Taiyo Boeki Kaisha New York Branch), Tsutsumi Hikokazu (Takata Shokai Cordomoiku Branch), Kumazaki Kyo (consul general), Tajima Shigeji (deputy manager of Mitsui & Co. Cordomoiku Branch), Tamura Yozo (manager of South Manchurian Railway Office), Minami Harunosuke (Manager of Kobe Suzuki Shoten’s New York branch), Takao Takada (Manager of Takada Iwai Shokai’s New York branch), and Iwao Nishi (Commercial Officer) are also mentioned. Therefore, this association, like the Japanese Art Association of New York, was supported by Japanese companies in the area.

The Gacho-kai held an exhibition at the Civic Club from November 1 to 21, 1922. The exhibition included works by Ando Kunie, Hara Makoto, Inaba Shotaro, Eitaro Ishigaki, Kotato Gado(T.K. Gado), Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Ryokichi Miki, Toshi Shimizu, Tetsuen Tera, Bumpei Usui, Torajiro Watanabe, Masaji Hiramoto, and Gozo Kawamura. The exhibition featured 54 paintings and sculptures.

Fig. 6. Eitaro Ishigaki in his studio “Young Japanese Artists Finds Strange Contrasts in American Men and Women”(Evening Telegram, Nov.4, 1922

The art styles of the artists of the New York Japanese Art Association ranged from Western paintings to applied arts. This was probably due to the fact that many Japanese artists at the time were supported by Japanese companies in the area. Later, the New York Japanese Art Association was consolidated into the newly formed Japanese Painting Association which named “Nihonjin Gakai”, which was composed mainly of painters and sculptors. 
In 1921, the Nihon-jin Gakai was renamed the “Gacho-kai”.

The patrons of the Gacho-kai included JInushi Ennosuke (manager of Morimura Brothers), Shirae Shinzo (deputy manager of Yamanaka Shokai New York Branch), Kodama Kashiro (manager of Taiyo Boeki Kaisha New York Branch), Tsutsumi Hikokazu (Takata Shokai Cordomoiku Branch), Kumazaki Kyo (consul general), Tajima Shigeji (deputy manager of Mitsui & Co. Cordomoiku Branch), Tamura Yozo (manager of South Manchurian Railway Office), Minami Harunosuke (Manager of Kobe Suzuki Shoten’s New York branch), Takao Takada (Manager of Takada Iwai Shokai’s New York branch), and Iwao Nishi (Commercial Officer) are also mentioned. Therefore, this association, like the Japanese Art Association of New York, was supported by Japanese companies in the area.

The Gacho-kai held an exhibition at the Civic Club from November 1 to 21, 1922. The exhibition included works by Ando Kunie, Hara Makoto, Inaba Shotaro, Eitaro Ishigaki, Kotato Gado(T.K. Gado), Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Ryokichi Miki, Toshi Shimizu, Tetsuen Tera, Bumpei Usui, Torajiro Watanabe, Masaji Hiramoto, and Gozo Kawamura. The exhibition featured 54 paintings and sculptures.